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Thursday, July 23, 2020 | History

4 edition of Punishing corporate crime found in the catalog.

Punishing corporate crime

Punishing corporate crime

legal penalties for criminal and regulatory violations

  • 399 Want to read
  • 33 Currently reading

Published by Oxford University Press in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Corporation law -- United States -- Criminal provisions,
  • Punishment -- United States

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    StatementJames T. O"Reilly ... [et al.].
    ContributionsO"Reilly, James T., 1947-
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsKF9351 .P86 2009
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. cm.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL23392357M
    ISBN 109780195386790
    LC Control Number2009021179

      Dr. Melissa L. Rorie is an Associate Professor of Criminal Justice at the University of Nevada - Las Vegas, USA. Her research focuses on the impact of formal and informal controls on corporate and white-collar offending. Dr. Rorie has published numerous peer-reviewed articles for journals including Crime, Law and Social Change, Criminology & Public Policy, Law & Policy, and the . Corporate Crime is a seminal work that laid the groundwork for analyses of important aspects of corporate behavior. It defined corporate crime and found ways of locating corporate violations from various sources. It even drew up measures of the seriousness of crimes. Much of this book still applies today to the corporate world and its illegal behavior.

    Corporate Crime and Punishment Fines levied by the SEC against a corporation for long-ago wrongdoing do not protect current investors. Steve Tombs and David Whyte, Regulatory Surrender: death, injury and the non-enforcement of law () A new book published by the Institute of Employment Rights documents how, during their time in office, New Labour’s desire to reduce the ‘burdens’ on businesses has emasculated the regulatory system that existed to prevent death and injury at work.

    Corporate Punishment Expressive Theory Corporate Crime Collective Agent Business Corporation These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves. White collar crime is a category of criminal financial offenses that typically occur in businesses, corporations or government agencies. and in some cases the fines appear motivated by a desire to end investigation and possible criminal charges against corporate officers. Punishing a Business for Unlawful Conduct.


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Punishing corporate crime Download PDF EPUB FB2

Punishing Corporate Crime: Legal Penalties for Criminal and Regulatory Violations provides a practical discussion of criminal punishment trends directed at the corporate entity. Corporate punishment, for the most part, has traditionally occurred either in the form of a fine or, in the extreme, a heavy sanction that terminates the business.

Punishing Corporate Crime book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers. Punishing Corporate Crime: Legal Penalties for Criminal and Regu 5/5(1). Punishing Corporate Crime: Legal Penalties for Criminal and Regulatory Violations provides a practical discussion of criminal punishment trends directed at the corporate entity.

Corporate punishment, for the most part, has traditionally occurred either in the form of a fine or, in the extreme, a heavy sanction that terminates the by: 3.

Now he has released a book on corporate crime. The title, “Too Big to Jail,” might suggest that his topic is only financial crimes, especially those related to the crisis, but the book addresses all sorts of corporate crimes: fraud, antitrust, bribery, import/export restrictions, evasion of environmental and pharmaceutical regulations.

Punishing Corporate Crime explores the new and evolving area of corporate criminal punishment that has emerged in the post- Enron era. This book offers key advice in addressing the new and evolving punishments that face corporations, as well as a consideration of preventative cturer: Oxford University Press.

James T. O'Reilly has 46 books on Goodreads with 23 ratings. James T. O'Reilly’s most popular book is Punishing Corporate Crime: Legal Penalties for Crim.

5. See, e.g., Assaf Hamdani & Alon Klement, ‘Corporate Crime and Deterrence’ () 61 Stan L Rev at at (this article also indicates that this is as distinct from the justifications for other sorts of criminalization); Archibald, Todd L, Jull, Kenneth E, & Roach, Kent W, Regulatory and Corporate Liability: From Due Diligence to Risk Management, (Aurora: Canada Law Book, ) at Cited by: 2.

Corporate Crime examines the ever-present problem of white-collar and corporate crime, not only within the United States but also worldwide. Should corporations and their employees be held criminally liable for shoddy business practices. This volume explores both sides of the question, discussing the nature and scope of corporate crime, the controversies surrounding it, and the most promising Reviews: 1.

Punishing Corporate Crime explores the new and evolving area of corporate criminal punishment that has emerged in the post- Enron era. This book offers key advice in addressing the new and evolving punishments that face corporations, as well as a consideration of preventative programs.

ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: xv, pages ; 26 cm: Contents: Defining the problem / James T. O'Reilly --Principles of criminal liability for corporate misconduct / James Patrick Hanlon --Constitutional considerations / James Patrick Hanlon --Individual criminal liability related to the corporation / James Patrick Hanlon --Criminal statutory liability.

Punishing corporate crime: Review of Brandon Garrett’s Too Big To Jail Nicholas Gilby, 28 December Professor Garrett has written an important book about a topic – corporate crime – that may not be a top concern of the ordinary person, but is arguably as important a topic as the type of crime (those against the person) that ordinary.

You have no items in your shopping cart. Order tracking. Search. Importantly, it can also be applied to individual corporate officers, such as chief executives and lower-level executives, and is especially effective in the finance and health care industries.

Business and the Law; Corporate Crime And THE Federal agency rewriting the rules for punishing corporations convicted of crimes has just Author: Stephen Labaton.

punishment is the -- is the criterion now. Deserved punishment for crime.”3 Justice Scalia’s answer endorses the retributive function of criminal law: just punishment for moral desert.

The answer also reflects the fact that * Teaching Fellow, FAS, Harvard Univ., SJD Candidate, Harvard Law School. LL.M.Harvard Law Size: KB. A third important sociological framework is the conflict theory. Unlike the structural functional theory, which views society as a peaceful unit, conflict theory interprets society as a struggle for power between groups engaging in conflict for limited Marx is the founder of conflict ct theorists like Marx posit that there are two general categories of people in.

Braithwaite () ‘Enforced Self-Regulation: A New Strategy for Corporate Crime Control’ Michigan Law Rev J. Braithwaite () ‘Challenging Just Deserts: Punishing White-Collar Criminals’ Journal of Criminal Law and Criminol J.

Braithwaite & G. Geis () ‘On Theory and Action for Corporate Crime Control’ Crime and Delinquency, April,   J.P. Hanlon, a partner at Baker & Daniels LLP and graduate of DePauw University, is among five lawyers from the firm who "have authored a book addressing a cutting-edge legal topic that is frequently in today's headlines: corporate crime." Punishing Corporate Crime: Legal Penalties for Criminal and Regulatory Violations has been published by Oxford University Press.

Corporate Crime: A Reference Handbook - Ebook written by Richard D. Hartley. Read this book using Google Play Books app on your PC, android, iOS devices. Download for offline reading, highlight, bookmark or take notes while you read Corporate Crime: A Reference Handbook.5/5(1).

Punishing Corporate Crime explores the new and evolving area of corporate criminal punishment that has emerged in the post- Enron era. This book offers key advice in addressing the new and evolving punishments that face corporations, as well as a consideration of.

Corporate Crime guides readers through the definitions and concepts as well as the difficulties in detecting, prosecuting, and punishing corporate wrongdoing.

You can write a book review and share your experiences. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Corporate Crime guides readers through the definitions and concepts as well as the difficulties in detecting, prosecuting, and punishing corporate wrongdoing.

The book concludes with a good index. This resource is highly recommended for all. A convicted hacker in Turkey received a year sentence for data theft, while a UK official calls for stronger sentences there.

Three hundred thirty four years – that’s how long a 26 year old Turkish national, Onur Kopçak was sentenced by a court in that country for his role in a cyber criminal operation that used a host of malicious web sites to “phish” or steal login credential.